System Shock

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System Shock

Post by FusTinG on Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:10 pm

System Shock is a 1994 first-person action role-playing video game developed by Looking Glass Technologies and published by Origin Systems. It was directed by Doug Church with Warren Spector serving as producer. The game is set aboard a space station in a cyberpunk vision of the year 2072. Assuming the role of a nameless hacker, the player attempts to hinder the plans of a malevolent artificial intelligence called SHODAN.

System Shock
Sysshock.jpg
Developer(s)
Looking Glass Technologies
Night Dive Studios (Enhanced Edition)
Publisher(s)
Origin Systems
Night Dive Studios (Enhanced Edition, Classic)
Director(s) Doug Church
Producer(s) Warren Spector
Programmer(s) Doug Church
Composer(s)
Greg LoPiccolo
Tim Ries
Platform(s)
MS-DOS
Mac OS
Microsoft Windows
OS X
Linux
Release
September 23, 1994
MS-DOS
NA: September 23, 1994
EU: November 1994
Mac OS
NA: December 23, 1994
Classic: Microsoft Windows, OS X, Linux, Enhanced Edition: Microsoft Windows
WW: September 22, 2015
Genre(s) Action role-playing
Mode(s) Single-player
System Shock's 3D engine, physics simulation and complex gameplay have been cited as both innovative and influential. The developers sought to build on the emergent gameplay and immersive environments of their previous games, Ultima Underworld: The Stygian Abyss and Ultima Underworld II: Labyrinth of Worlds, by streamlining their mechanics into a more "integrated whole".

Critics praised System Shock and hailed it as a major breakthrough in its genre. It was later placed on multiple hall of fame lists. The game was a moderate commercial success, with sales exceeding 170,000 copies, but Looking Glass ultimately lost money on the project. A sequel, System Shock 2, was released by Looking Glass Studios and offshoot developer Irrational Games in 1999. The 2000 game Deus Ex (also produced by Spector) and the 2007 game BioShock are spiritual successors to the two games. A remade version of the original game by Night Dive Studios is scheduled for release in 2018.

Gameplay Edit


The player looks at the door below, while the player character wields a lead pipe. The character's health and energy are displayed at the top right; manipulable readouts to the left of them determine the character's posture and view angle. The three "multi-function display" windows at the bottom depict weapon information, the inventory and an automap, respectively.
System Shock takes place from a first-person perspective in a three-dimensional (3D) graphical environment.[1] The game is set inside a large, multi-level space station, in which players explore, combat enemies and solve puzzles.[1][2] Progress is largely non-linear and the game is designed to allow for emergent gameplay.[3] As in Ultima Underworld,[4] the player uses a freely movable mouse cursor to aim weapons, to interact with objects and to manipulate the heads-up display (HUD) interface.[5] View and posture controls on the HUD allow the player to lean left or right, look up or down, crouch, and crawl. Practical uses for these actions include taking cover, retrieving items from beneath the player character and navigating small passages, respectively. The HUD also features three "Multi-Function Displays", which may be configured to display information such as weapon readouts, an automap and an inventory.[5]

The player advances the plot by acquiring log discs and e-mails: the game contains no non-player characters with which to converse.[5][6][7] Throughout the game, an evil artificial intelligence called SHODAN hinders the player's progress with traps and blocked pathways.[8] Specific computer terminals allow the player to temporarily enter Cyberspace; inside, the player moves weightlessly through a wire frame 3D environment, while collecting data and fighting SHODAN's security programs. Actions in Cyberspace sometimes cause events in the game's physical world; for example, certain locked doors may only be opened in Cyberspace.[5] Outside of Cyberspace, the player uses the game's sixteen weapons, of which a maximum of seven may be carried at one time, to combat robots, cyborgs and mutants controlled by SHODAN. Projectile weapons often have selectable ammunition types with varying effects; for example, the "dart pistol" may fire either explosive needles or tranquilizers.[5][6] Energy weapons and several types of explosives may also be found, with the latter ranging from percussion grenades to land mines.[5]
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Team Fortress 2

Post by FusTinG on Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:12 pm

Team Fortress 2 (TF2) is a team-based multiplayer first-person shooter video game developed and published by Valve Corporation. It is the sequel to the 1996 mod Team Fortress for Quake and its 1999 remake, Team Fortress Classic. It was released as part of the video game bundle The Orange Box in October 2007 for Microsoft Windows and the Xbox 360.[1] A PlayStation 3 version followed in December 2007.[2] The game was released for Windows as a standalone entry in April 2008, and was updated to support OS X in June 2010 and Linux in February 2013. It is distributed online through Valve's digital retailer Steam, with retail distribution being handled by Electronic Arts.

Team Fortress 2
Tf2 standalonebox.jpg
Box art for the standalone PC version of Team Fortress 2
Developer(s) Valve Corporation
Publisher(s) Valve Corporation
Designer(s)
John Cook
Robin Walker
Composer(s) Mike Morasky
Engine Source
Platform(s)
Microsoft Windows
Xbox 360
PlayStation 3
OS X
Linux
Release
October 10, 2007
Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360 (The Orange Box)
NA: October 10, 2007
EU: October 18, 2007
AU: October 25, 2007
PlayStation 3
AU: November 22, 2007
EU: November 23, 2007
NA: December 11, 2007
OS X
WW: June 10, 2010
Linux
WW: February 14, 2013
Genre(s) First-person shooter
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer
In Team Fortress 2, players join one of two teams comprising nine character classes, battling in a variety of game modes including capture the flag and king of the hill. The development is led by John Cook and Robin Walker, creators of the original Team Fortress. Announced in 1998, the game once had more realistic, militaristic visuals and gameplay, but this changed over the protracted nine-year development. After Valve released no information for six years, Team Fortress 2 regularly featured in Wired News' annual vaporware list among other ignominies.[3] The finished Team Fortress 2 has cartoon-like visuals influenced by the art of J. C. Leyendecker, Dean Cornwell, and Norman Rockwell,[4] and uses Valve's Source game engine.

Team Fortress 2 received critical acclaim for its art direction, gameplay, humor, and use of character in a multiplayer-only game.[5][6][7][8] Valve continues to release new content, including maps, items and game modes, as well as community-made updates and contributed content. In June 2011, it became free-to-play, supported by microtransactions for in-game cosmetics. A 'drop system' was also added and refined, allowing free-to-play users to periodically receive game equipment and items by use of a random number generator. Though the game had a unofficial competitive scene for many years, support for official competitive play through ranked matchmaking and an overhauled casual experience was added in July 2016.
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Re: System Shock

Post by Hari. on Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:07 pm

Nice
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Re: System Shock

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