APB: All Points Bulletin

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APB: All Points Bulletin

Post by FusTinG on Sat Nov 04, 2017 11:13 pm

APB: All Points Bulletin[5] is an open world multiplayer online video game for Microsoft Windows[6] developed by Realtime Worlds and was acquired by Reloaded Productions, which is part of the GamersFirst company.[7][8] Based in urban sprawls and featuring two factions, Enforcers and the Criminals, players can form sub-groups in either faction and carry out missions. The game design was led by David Jones, and was developed by Realtime Worlds. It was released on 29 June 2010 in North America and Europe.[2]

APB: All Points Bulletin
All Points Bulletin.jpg
Original European boxart
Developer(s) Realtime Worlds (former)
Reloaded Productions (acquisition)
Publisher(s) Realtime Worlds
K2 Network (acquisition)
Designer(s) David Jones
Engine Unreal Engine 3[1]
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows
Xbox One
PlayStation 4
Release Microsoft Windows
NA: 29 June 2010
EU: 1 July 2010
UK: 2 July 2010[2]
Xbox One
3 June 2016[3]

PlayStation 4
31 March 2017[4]
Genre(s) Action-adventure, third-person shooter
Mode(s) Multiplayer
After Realtime Worlds was placed into administration on 17 August 2010, the servers for online play were shut down later that year, but were reactivated when online gaming company K2 Network purchased APB for £1.5 million and relaunched it under their subsidiary company Reloaded Productions as a free-to-play game, renamed APB: Reloaded.

On 22 January 2015, Deep Silver announced versions of the game for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in collaboration with Reloaded Productions and The Workshop Entertainment for release in Q2 of 2015.[4][9] The game was ultimately released on 3 June 2016 for Xbox One and 31 March 2017 for the PlayStation 4.

Gameplay Edit

APB: All Points Bulletin takes place in the modern-day city of San Paro where there is a constant battle between Enforcers and Criminals, and the player will need to decide to which faction they want to belong.

Gameplay typically consists of the two sides fighting one another in missions, where one side must complete a series of objectives with the other side attempting to stop them doing so. For example, several Criminal players may rob a convenience store within the game; the game will then seek out one or more Enforcer players of equivalent skills and other criteria and will issue an all-points bulletin for them to stop the robbery and apprehend or eliminate the Criminals. Players earn money for participating in these missions, which can then be used to upgrade weapons, vehicles, and their character appearances, all of which influence the game.[10]

The game is played in the third person perspective. Upgrades, equipment, weapons, vehicles and clothing can be purchased from various contacts around the city (or can be alternatively bought through terminals in the social district), while ammunition is bought from vending machine-like terminals. Both the contacts and the "vending machines" are scattered throughout the main three districts of the city. Two of the districts feature their own fully persistent portions of San Paro, with their own pedestrian AI and a dynamic day/night cycle, along with certain contacts and missions. The third district acts mainly as a social component, being much smaller, having no pedestrians, restricting weapon and vehicle access, and featuring garages, auction houses, music studios, and several other non-player character (NPC) terminal shops. While in the third district, players, even if they're from opposing factions, cannot harm each other and may only interact through chat. In the other two districts, players are allowed to attack each other (so long as they are from opposing factions) during certain mission scenarios and/or if a player has a bounty on his head. When outside of these missions players can still draw and use weapons, but bullets, grenades, etc. will not work on other players, even those from an enemy faction. This prevents deathmatching and griefing.

There are also two other districts under the category of "fight club". These feature pure player versus player (PvP) environments for more experienced players and clans.
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Armagetron Advanced

Post by FusTinG on Sat Nov 04, 2017 11:14 pm

Armagetron Advanced is a multiplayer snake game in 3D based on the light cycle sequence from the film Tron.[1] It is available for Linux, OS X, Microsoft Windows, AmigaOS 4[2] and OpenBSD as free and open-source software.

Armagetron Advanced
Armagetron Advanced.png
Armagetron2.png
A local game of Armagetron Advanced.
Developer(s) Dave Fancella ("Lucifer"), "epsy", Fred ("Tank Program"), Jochen Darley ("joda.bot"), Luke Dashjr, Daniel Harple ("dlh"), Mathias Plichta ("wrtlprnft"), Manuel Moos ("Z-Man")
Initial release 2001
Operating system Microsoft Windows, OS X, Linux
Type Snake game
License GPLv2+
Website armagetronad.org
History Edit

The game development started in 2000 under the name "Armagetron - Multiplayer Lightcycle Game" as free and open-source software released under version 2 of the GNU General Public License on Sourceforge.net.[3] On March 2005 the project continued under the name "Armagetron Advanced", which is also hosted on sourceforge.net[4] and is still actively developed.

Gameplay Edit

Two or more players are represented by dual-wheeled motor vehicles, or light cycles, in a grid-lined arena. The vehicles constantly move forward, leaving a coloured trail behind them as they travel. Contact with either the arena walls or a trail left by a player will result in death and elimination from the battle (not only does this remove their trail entirely, the explosion also breaches trails a short distance away). Therefore, players attempt to box each other in order to force their opponents to touch their trail or one of the arena walls. Players can change the direction of movement, by turning 90 degrees to the left or right (though in some servers the number of axes is more than four, making it possible to turn 45 degrees, or none at all).

Being close to a coloured trail causes the bike to accelerate; the closer the player is to the trail, the greater the acceleration. This allows players to accelerate and use the resulting speed advantage to outmanoeuvre their opponents. Players are able to use a brake, the 'v' key by default, to slow down, however, the effectiveness of the brake varies from server to server. Some servers even implement a 'speed brake', which turns the brake key into an accelerator.

Game modes Edit
Several game modes exist:

Fast Track (FT): A free-for-all game mode with up to 8 players. High rubber, high speed, and very high enemy wall acceleration make for very intense gameplay.
Team Gauntlet: Two teams compete with each other on various generated maps.
Wild Fortress: Objective is to conquer the opponents' zone.
Rotation: Two teams compete on various game modes.
Death Match: Last man standing. (One of the most common ways played)
No Rubber (NR): Played with no or one rubber. Rubber is a mechanism that helps to account for lag. The more rubber, the greater leeway the server allows the player. Touching a wall will result in instant death, making this a fast-paced game mode where players need fast reflexes.
Low Rubber (LR): Played with an average of five to ten rubber.
Medium Rubber (MR): Played with an average of ten to fifteen rubber.
High Rubber (HR): Played with an average of fifteen to thirty rubber. And a speed of about 20-40
Dog Fight (DF): Currently it is a mode that consists of slow to medium speed bikes and medium rubber (around 12).
Loose / Open Play: Usually played with medium speed bikes or DF settings. On loose servers (any servers with "Loose Dogfight" in the name) there are rules for trapping the opponent that disallow completely grinding or sealing the tail of another player (known as stabbing/digging). This leaves an open path that an opponent can in theory maneuver through without having to "dig" underneath another player's grind. This is the only game mode in which the player is not 'allowed' to do certain things within the game, such as stabbing, although the server does not specifically restrict them.[citation needed]
Team Death Match: Cooperate with teammates.
Fortress: Capture the enemy base. This game can be played with teams or death match style.
Sumo: The object is to stay in a zone while trying to force the opponent out, forcing their zone to collapse and their cycle to explode.
Race: Race to the win zone at the end of the map.
Maze: Find a path to the win zone.
Sty Patch (formerly Pig Sty):
Shooting: A team death match where the object is to try to shoot the other team's players with death zones.
StyBall: A team match where the object is to score a goal by pushing the ball zone into the goal zone. (quite similar to football)
Capture the Flag (CTF): Capture the opponents' flag. Players are respawned if they are dead and a player (ally or opponent) touches the base on the respective side. (This is a 2 team Game Mode)
Capture The Flag Shooting (CTFS): Capture the opponents' flag while shooting. Players are respawned if they are dead and a player (ally or opponent) touches the base on the respective side.
Flag Fortress (FF): A fortress game with fortress physics with the objective being to capture the opponents flag. Players are respawned if they are dead and a player (ally or opponent) touches the base with the respective color.
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Re: APB: All Points Bulletin

Post by Hari. on Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:45 am

Nice
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Re: APB: All Points Bulletin

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